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Thread: Do all rsv's have a slipper clutch

  1. #21
    Baby Twin Grady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolenc View Post
    If you blip too hard the bike will jump a bit foward when you let go of the clutch, but wont do any damage.

    Also Grady mentioned to let go of the clutch slowly, well yes on the street thats what I also do. But when blipping you have to let go, otherwise you loose all the revs and you havent done anything
    Also clutch gets worn for nothing.

    Dont get me wrong Im not defending that sliper clutches or blipping is bad, I love it

    But be real, the wheel wont lock bellow 7-8k rpm, also the slipper doesnt work like it should below this rpm range(not enought vacum) and how many times you "hot brake" for a corner and bang the gearbox down on this rpm on the street. Its a v twin not a l4 600cc machine.

    I also do it on the street, to practise, but I do realise that it wont lock and it doesnt matter how racey I feel

    And to anwser the question, yes, most rotax engines on aprilias, all rsv, rsvr, tuono, futura, falco, caponord...
    I agree with you on what you said. I guess I am just having trouble coming across with the whole "letting the clutch out slowly" thing. I've been riding and racing for long enough to know when I butcher a blip, or have something go wrong with the bike (like have it flood out and not blip properly etc.). That is when they (my old race instructors) recommend to let it out slowly. So, you are correct that you should just let it out if you have the proper RPM settings, but if the bike is held at too low of an rpm, then you should slip it.

    On the street, I generally will let the clutch out slowly on a downshift. Not because I'm hitting the rpm's wrong, but mainly because it gives it a smoother ride, especially riding 2-up. I don't slip it enough to have it really do any harm to the clutch, I just do it enough to be sure turns the gear to the correct rpm.

    There was actually a race I ran a few years back in the CMRA series where I didn't even have a clutch . It is possible to still blip the throttle and downshift properly, but you better be sure you hit it correctly. On that bike, I didn't have a slipper clutch. It was rather funny because I ended up running my fastest lap time at Hallett Raceway that day without the use of a clutch. I know how harmful it is to bang through 1st and 2nd gear without a clutch, but when it's race time, you've gotta do what you've gotta do .

  2. #22
    BRG
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    Superbike Twin BRG's Avatar
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    I speak from heresay, but...

    Aren't we missing something here?

    True, a slipper is designed to remove the consequences of a mismatched downshift, but once the device is in place, it opens up the possibility of a new way of riding/racing.

    On the track, however adroitly it's done, blipping on downshift requires a fair bit of dexterity and time. I would also suggest that simultaneously braking and blipping demands more concentration than braking without blipping, ergo it's easier to maximise one's braking if one's not blipping.

    So, to ride a slipper to maximum advantage, consider simply banging down through the gears without blipping (cf. http://www.sigmaperformance.com/slip...tch-faq.html#4).

    If this sounds a little harsh (and it does to me!) then use a single draw of the clutch around all down-shifts of a sequence, which are done in quick succession just before TP, then winding on the power into AX, allowing the slipper to balance the throttle demand to the roadspeed.

  3. #23
    Dolenc
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    Yes it takes some practise to perfect it, but when you know how, you do it naturaly. Look at this guy.

    I admit Im still not good with blipping, I also have a tendency to let go of the clutch slowly or I concentrate on it too much, but Im getting there slowly

  4. #24
    Baby Twin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolenc View Post
    Yes it takes some practise to perfect it, but when you know how, you do it naturaly. Look at this guy.

    Great technique one to watch and learn.^

    I was quite interested in the whole slipper clutch question and wondered how effective they were on the Milles. As in the majority of case we are not talking '08 or '09 technology.

    Personally I have just got rid of a big bore Japanese IL4 use on road and hard on track no slipper clutch but getting it moving/skipping into a corner is a fucking joy..
    Currently only using a small bore Monster..

    Shall be hopefully picking up an early RSV-R in a couple of weeks time.
    Cannot wait for summer and a chance to get it on track at Anglesey and be banging it down a couple into The Banking..

  5. #25
    ibanezwizz
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    It depends on many factors. I’ve tried the PPC system out because I wanted to know how it works. It’s ok but not really a proper slipper clutch system for racing applications. Yes, you can lock it up on the street; all you need is a slippery road and aggressive ridding technique – which I carried out for testing purposes. It won’t work if you bleep the throttle. Well, having said that it depends on how much you blip, small blips and it will still work. Large blip however will result in revs getting too high and PPC won’t work. Otherwise it’s meant for the street not for track. On good surface asphalt Mille is good anyway and there is hardly a need for it, though take this torque to slippery road, rush your downshift with revs too high and the PPC will definitely start puffing and strutting its stuff perhaps saving your bacon in the process.

  6. #26
    Baby Twin Casperfelix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grady View Post
    I've always ridden GSXR's before I had the RSVR, and I have ALWAYS blipped the throttle. Some of my bikes have had slippers, some of my bikes have had regular clutches (that includes my race bikes). I have always blipped the throttle while downshifting. I do it nearly every single gear on the street.

    Granted I have never taken the RSVR on the track, I can't imagine not blipping the throttle. I feel like it would be teaching me bad habits, and I don't see how that could possibly be more effective than blipping while downshifting (when done properly of course).

    You mean to tell me, that if you have the RSVR in high rpm's, that regular downshifting won't make the rear wheel dance? I have had it in high RPM's and downshifted (sporting around on the street) and have yet to have the rear dance on me.

    A lot of the time, riders while blipping the throttle just let the clutch out instantly after clicking down on the shift lever. From the race schools I have attended (and from a sheer practical sense) you're supposed to let the clutch out slowly; allowing it to slip while downshifting.

    My '97 GSXR 750 (the on in my avatar) had kevlar friction plates in it. You better believe that I ran that motorcycle hot into corners, downshifting at extremely high rpm's. The phrase "slipper clutch" was merely a figment of one's imagination back then.

    I'm not arguing here, but maybe I'm missing something. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I will, and always have, strongly advised blipping the throttle; no matter what technology. I have used both old and new style systems and blipping has performed flawlessly on both. I don't see how an Aprilia with a PPC system could honestly be that much different .

    Sorry to go off on this little tangent, but this struck some curiosity in me and I'd like to know what others think on this topic.
    ...........just let the clutch out instantly after clicking down on the shift lever!
    So that's my mistake? I need to start disengaging the clutch when down-shifting under heavy braking.
    Mmmmmmm need to think about that.

  7. #27
    Baby Twin
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    hi people ,, 20008 mille R ,, went for a short blast today & the clutch starts slipping ,, it done this befor last summer , then came ok again ...is there a clutch valve that gives trouble , or does it sound like I need to replace the clutch ?
    thanks.

  8. #28
    Baby Twin
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    Quote Originally Posted by patsy View Post
    hi people ,, 20008 mille R ,, went for a short blast today & the clutch starts slipping ,, it done this befor last summer , then came ok again ...is there a clutch valve that gives trouble , or does it sound like I need to replace the clutch ?
    thanks.
    Change to Motul oil may cure the trouble with clutch.

  9. #29
    Baby Twin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grady View Post
    I've always ridden GSXR's before I had the RSVR, and I have ALWAYS blipped the throttle. Some of my bikes have had slippers, some of my bikes have had regular clutches (that includes my race bikes). I have always blipped the throttle while downshifting. I do it nearly every single gear on the street.

    Granted I have never taken the RSVR on the track, I can't imagine not blipping the throttle. I feel like it would be teaching me bad habits, and I don't see how that could possibly be more effective than blipping while downshifting (when done properly of course).

    You mean to tell me, that if you have the RSVR in high rpm's, that regular downshifting won't make the rear wheel dance? I have had it in high RPM's and downshifted (sporting around on the street) and have yet to have the rear dance on me.


    A lot of the time, riders while blipping the throttle just let the clutch out instantly after clicking down on the shift lever. From the race schools I have attended (and from a sheer practical sense) you're supposed to let the clutch out slowly; allowing it to slip while downshifting.

    My '97 GSXR 750 (the on in my avatar) had kevlar friction plates in it. You better believe that I ran that motorcycle hot into corners, downshifting at extremely high rpm's. The phrase "slipper clutch" was merely a figment of one's imagination back then.

    I'm not arguing here, but maybe I'm missing something. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I will, and always have, strongly advised blipping the throttle; no matter what technology. I have used both old and new style systems and blipping has performed flawlessly on both. I don't see how an Aprilia with a PPC system could honestly be that much different .

    Sorry to go off on this little tangent, but this struck some curiosity in me and I'd like to know what others think on this topic.
    Because for the PPC to work on the aprilia, it needs a certain amount of vacuum, which is only present on closed throttle

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