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Thread: Rear axle torque and chain adjustment

  1. #1
    Baby Twin Bol D'or's Avatar
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    Rear axle torque and chain adjustment

    Adjusted the chain for the first time on Saturday, the rear axle nut was ludicrously tight.
    The swingarm actually relaxed so much it moved a fair bit along the paddock stand bobbins!
    I've read 120NM is recommended by Aprilia, but some people say that's too much and use more like 90NM?

    Also, I really don't like the adjusters.
    I prefer adjusters where the wheel is pulled towards you as you adjust.
    Anyone bought Gilles or similar?
    I've read RSV4 Gilles adjustors fit the RSVR swingarm?
    They're only 70 a pair, I will happily buy them if they fit.

  2. #2
    Baby Twin andreas's Avatar
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    Hi! 120 Nm is the textbook (and Aprilia) figure - it's an M25 nut!

  3. #3
    One Liter Duc Eater nikfubar's Avatar
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    120Nm can damage bearings, now recommended 100Nm

  4. #4
    Evil Twin Tifa's Avatar
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    Interesting.
    I always thought the load was taken on the bearing inner races/spacers?
    In theory, I recon you could go 250Nm+ (NO dont!) without increasing the load on the balls themselves?
    I'm fairly sure the spacers and inner races could withstand a lateral force of a few tons without collapsing?
    As far as I can see, the weakest link is the amount of welly the axle stand can put up with.

  5. #5
    Baby Twin Bol D'or's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip on the torque, I'll go with 100nm.
    How do others adjust the chain on this particular bike?
    I'm used to bikes where the wheel is pulled backwards by the adjusters.
    I'm not a fan of the Aprilia system where the wheel seems to 'hang loose' and needs constantly pushed back onto the adjusters.

  6. #6
    Baby Twin andreas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bol D'or View Post
    Thanks for the tip on the torque, I'll go with 100nm.
    How do others adjust the chain on this particular bike?
    I'm used to bikes where the wheel is pulled backwards by the adjusters.
    I'm not a fan of the Aprilia system where the wheel seems to 'hang loose' and needs constantly pushed back onto the adjusters.


    A lot of motorcycles use the same system . . . I don't find a problem with it!

  7. #7
    Baby Twin andreas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tifa View Post
    Interesting.
    I always thought the load was taken on the bearing inner races/spacers?
    In theory, I recon you could go 250Nm+ (NO dont!) without increasing the load on the balls themselves?
    I'm fairly sure the spacers and inner races could withstand a lateral force of a few tons without collapsing?
    As far as I can see, the weakest link is the amount of welly the axle stand can put up with.

    Exactly! I'm afraid I couldn't be arsed to spell that out . . . !

  8. #8
    One Liter Duc Eater nikfubar's Avatar
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    I agree you should be able to tighten it up until the threads on the spindle are stripped or something snaps without affecting the bearings but that's in an ideal world where everything is machined to perfect tolerances, in reality it only needs to be tight enough to stop the wheel twisting in the swinging arm under load & if the adjusters had been designed better you probably wouldn't even need to tighten it to 100Nm.
    When I adjust mine I only loosen the spindle nut enough to be able to move the wheel using the adjuster bolts. If you slacken it right off it becomes awkward to adjust if the wheels flopping around all over the place.

  9. #9
    Baby Twin andreas's Avatar
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    Nikfubar - fasteners used in critical locations have a recommended torque value so that the fastener will be within its elastic 'window' - essential if it's to do its job correctly. Have a Google at the metallurgical properties of the various materials used in fasteners . . .

  10. #10
    Baby Twin Bol D'or's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nikfubar View Post
    When I adjust mine I only loosen the spindle nut enough to be able to move the wheel using the adjuster bolts. If you slacken it right off it becomes awkward to adjust if the wheels flopping around all over the place.
    This sounds like a good idea, keep some pressure on the wheel so it's not totally loose and needs the adjuster bolts to make it move.
    I've had well over 40 bikes, but never seen this type of adjustment before.
    It's always been the adjusters at the back, pulling the wheel towards you.

  11. #11
    One Liter Duc Eater nikfubar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andreas View Post
    Nikfubar - fasteners used in critical locations have a recommended torque value so that the fastener will be within its elastic 'window' - essential if it's to do its job correctly. Have a Google at the metallurgical properties of the various materials used in fasteners . . .


    Like I said in an ideal world
    Using a lubricant, and how it is applied, is a critical aspect establishing a coefficient of friction, and therefore of how torque is turned into axial stretch. If the lubricant is not used when it is called for, the coefficient of friction will increase to the point where the fastener is likely not sufficiently preloaded - you will reach the torque value before the fastener is stretched because you are consuming the torque overcoming the friction. If the fastener is lubricated when it was not supposed to be lubricated, the specified torque will likely cause yielding, or even snap the stud or bolt as more turns will be achieved due to the lower coefficient of friction.
    Last edited by nikfubar; May 7th, 2014 at 02:04 AM.

  12. #12
    Baby Twin andreas's Avatar
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    (sigh) I know - but WTF mentioned lubricant?

  13. #13
    One Liter Duc Eater nikfubar's Avatar
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    All I'm saying is you can't make a sweeping statement that it has to be tightened to 120Nm the Aprilia manual does not state if the threads should be lubricated or dry when setting the torque, in the factory they would probably be dry. If the threads have chain lube on them or whoevers fitting it decides to put some grease on the spindle & threads (as most do ) this could mean the torque setting should be reduced by up to 50% depending on the type of grease used, not that I would suggest you only do it up to 60Nm but like the picture says, can of worms.

  14. #14
    Evil Twin Tifa's Avatar
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    I'm lost.
    Why would you want to put any sort of lubricant on the axle nuts?
    It will only make the nut come off easier.

  15. #15
    Baby Twin Bol D'or's Avatar
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    Heard of greasing the axle before, make it slide in and out easier.
    But never greasing the threads.

  16. #16
    One Liter Duc Eater nikfubar's Avatar
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    Sorry I'm gonna shut up now

  17. #17
    Superbike Twin Dr_D's Avatar
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    Haynes manual says 90Nm and it states original figure of 120Nm (as given in the official Aprilia Workshop Manual) has seen wheel bearing failure
    pp 1- 25 of the official Aprilia Workshop Manual says use grease (Bimol grease 481) on the threads

    Worms yummy!

  18. #18
    Baby Twin Bol D'or's Avatar
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    Torque wrench finally arrived, I torque'd it up to 90NM
    Was surprised how tight 90NM is, it's probably tigher than I would do it without a torque wrench!
    120NM must be seriously tight.

  19. #19
    Superbike Twin ride4fun's Avatar
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    I've always torqued mine to 120Nm, as per the Aprilia manual, and I've never had any problems with my bearings in over 18,000 miles.

    I keep the threads clean but dry and free of any lubricants. If you lubricate the threads, this will reduce the friction and thus would increase the amount of turning and the compression load upon the bearing spacers.

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