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Thread: Interested in a Aprilia RSV, help appreciated!

  1. #1
    Baby Twin
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    Interested in a Aprilia RSV, help appreciated!

    Hello everyone,

    After a good year without a motorcycle i started looking around and ended up with the lovely Aprilia RSVR . I started looking around and the bike fits me perfectly and the sound is awesome!
    Before i really want to really search for my perfect Aprilia i have a few questions and i was hoping you guys are able to help me.

    #1 - I would like a model 2006 and up because i love the "newer" model, and the dual exhausts are just sexy. I noticed there are Factory versions (with Ohlin parts), and the "regular" models without the Ohlin parts. How big are the differences? I kinda like the black 2005 RSV1000R model, which doesn't have the Ohlin parts.

    #2 - I hear alot of different things about the maintenance on the bike, are the parts expensive, are they sturdy etc.? I can barely change a battery in my TV Remote, so i do most of the maintenance at a garage/dealer.

    #3 - Does the bike hold her value?

    #4 - Any known problems on the bike i should look out for when im out to buy one of these beauties?


    Well, i guess these are the questions i have right now, and i look forward on hearing your thoughts! Hopefully i soon will also be a RSVR owner!


    Robert

  2. #2
    Superbike Twin ride4fun's Avatar
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    You're likely to get lots of opinions about this, but I'll get the ball rolling for you.

    I have a later Gen 2 RSVR (not Factory); there was a slight re-styling done for the last couple years. This has the Ohlins front forks/radial Brembo brakes, but a Sachs rear shock, no carbon, and not the Oz wheels; that's the fundamental differences between the models. When I bought the bike new, the insurance for the Factory version was GBP 100.00 more, probably because of the carbon bits. Not sure how this will affect you in your country.

    If you are going to ride the bike on the road, I would think it unlikely that you would fully appreciate the weight savings made by riding the Factory version, although it is obviously more desirable to most. The Ohlins forks and Brembo brakes, however, are superb. Once set up for your weight and riding styke, the Ohlins forks are so supple and smooth, and the Brembo's very powerful.

    Service parts aren't too expensive, however, body panels and such like can be, more so for the Factory version. And doing basic maintenance is quite straight forward; oil/filter changes, air filter (replace with a K&N or such like), spark plugs, etc. Nothing should beyond any competent mechanic.

    There are some common weaknesses, and below are the ones I've encountered.

    1. Gearing: Standard is way too tall, and most change the sprockets to lower it slightly. I've reduced the front sprocket to 15 teeth, but some also increase the rear's.

    2. Clutch Slave Cylinder: The seal on this erodes turning the fluid black, and a sticky function. Eventually it tends to fail. Best thing to do is replace the entire unit, such as that manufactured by Oberon.

    3. Rear Brake: Starts off good when bled correctly (there is a knack to doing this), but inevitably fades until it becomes ineffective over many miles. You can either bleed it every few thousand miles, fit rearsets to remount the master cylinder vertically, or use a master cylinder better designed for horizontal mounting.

    4. Ignition Map: If your bike is fitted with after-market silencers, e.g. Akropovic, make sure you go to a specialist to switch the bike from Map 1 to Map 2. If you don't it won't run right, and is likely to stall when you stop.

    The next two are particular to my experience; I've not known any others suffering these.

    5. Leaking Fuel Filler Cap: The seal on mine seemed to have shrunk, but a new seal isn't available, and the cap doesn't dismantle very easily. To replace the original part in it's entirety was twice the price of fitting a race-style filler of twice the better quality.

    6. Lower Fairing Spacer: The right hand lower fairing is kept away from the exhaust by a little rubber spacer fitted to a vertical post attached to the downpipe. Mine had cracked and fell off, leading to the now uninsulated post melting a hole through my fairing. It took me years to identify the part, because it isn't listed, meaning the Aprilia dealers won't be able to source it for you. If you ever need one, order part number AP8120712; it's very cheap, and used on most bikes within the Piaggio group.

    Apart from these little foibles, the bike is generally very robust and reliable. It's great to ride, can lean far further than you can believe whilst remaining stable and smooth. The V-twin drive out of corners allows you to get on the power early, and it is sublimely fast. And, of course, it's beautiful to look at and sounds fantastic.

  3. #3
    Baby Twin
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    Heya ride4fun,

    Thanks for your quick and detailed answer! I immediatly checked with the insurance and the price seems to stay the same. I seem to have to pay 11 bucks a month, Factory or non-factory.

    For me, i do not think the difference between Non Factory and Factory aren't big enough to really only hunt for a Factory model.

    1. Gearing: Standard is way too tall, and most change the sprockets to lower it slightly. I've reduced the front sprocket to 15 teeth, but some also increase the rear's.
    Whats the downside of the tallness? Difficult gear changing?

    2. Clutch Slave Cylinder: The seal on this erodes turning the fluid black, and a sticky function. Eventually it tends to fail. Best thing to do is replace the entire unit, such as that manufactured by Oberon.
    Is this unit expensive to replace? If not, might be a smart thing to do immediately after purchasing the bike?

    4. Ignition Map: If your bike is fitted with after-market silencers, e.g. Akropovic
    I saw a bike with Akra's, you mention changing from map 1 to 2, do i need a hardware piece (commander?) to change the mapping?


    Thanks again ride4fun.

  4. #4
    Superbike Twin badapple's Avatar
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    Well said

  5. #5
    Superbike Twin ride4fun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RvdVeen View Post
    Heya ride4fun,

    Thanks for your quick and detailed answer! I immediatly checked with the insurance and the price seems to stay the same. I seem to have to pay 11 bucks a month, Factory or non-factory.

    For me, i do not think the difference between Non Factory and Factory aren't big enough to really only hunt for a Factory model.

    1. Gearing: Standard is way too tall, and most change the sprockets to lower it slightly. I've reduced the front sprocket to 15 teeth, but some also increase the rear's.
    Whats the downside of the tallness? Difficult gear changing?

    2. Clutch Slave Cylinder: The seal on this erodes turning the fluid black, and a sticky function. Eventually it tends to fail. Best thing to do is replace the entire unit, such as that manufactured by Oberon.
    Is this unit expensive to replace? If not, might be a smart thing to do immediately after purchasing the bike?

    4. Ignition Map: If your bike is fitted with after-market silencers, e.g. Akropovic
    I saw a bike with Akra's, you mention changing from map 1 to 2, do i need a hardware piece (commander?) to change the mapping?


    Thanks again ride4fun.
    I'd suggest you try a slightly later bike with the Ohlins and Brembos, whether Factory, or not, then decide whether to go for the early or late Gen 2; I suspect you will feel the difference.

    The problem with the gearing chosen by Aprilia is that it was selected for top speed. On the road this will mean you will be constantly slipping the clutch around town, and the gears being too widely spaced for maximum effect whilst having fun around your favourite twisty roads.

    The Oberon clutch slave cylinder isn't very expensive at all, and is lovely piece of engineering, and a simple direct replacement to the original. Go to their website for further information.

    The ignition system has already been pre-programmed with two maps; one for standard road cans, and the other for open cans (without the cat). An Aprilia dealer, or other specialist, will simply plug the computer into your bike and change the setting as required for you. No need for a Power Commander as long as you don't start doing some more serious engine modifications.

  6. #6
    Baby Twin
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    A late Gen 2? So around 2006, 2007 + ? Im trying to find a good deal around 5,000 and anything after 2008 seems to shoot up in price. he he

  7. #7
    Superbike Twin ride4fun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RvdVeen View Post
    A late Gen 2? So around 2006, 2007 + ? Im trying to find a good deal around 5,000 and anything after 2008 seems to shoot up in price. he he
    Well, it'll still be a great bike.

  8. #8
    Baby Twin
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    Just came across a bike, APRILIA RSV 1000 R 2005 Zwart - 27000Km - Motorservice Edgar Stijner - Motoroccasion.nl - 27.000 KM (like 16.000 miles) , 2005, Has Akri's, Lowered footsteps (also has the stock ones that i can put on again), , higher windscreen and has something for the mirrors to higher them, not sure what thats about.. but the bike looks nice. Price goes for 5250eu

  9. #9
    Superbike Twin ride4fun's Avatar
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    Looks like a nice bike. First thing I'd do is remove all the high-rise bits and bobs, and get it back to standard. Are you going to take it for a spin?

  10. #10
    Baby Twin
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    Its 2 hours from my hometown, might go and pay a visit this week tho .. Im wondering tho, would this bike have the same worth in 2 years for example? or atleast still be worth 4k ?

  11. #11
    Superbike Twin ride4fun's Avatar
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    I would have thought the major depreciation has already occurred. As long as you maintain the bike properly and don't allow it to deteriorate, crash it, or do a massive amount of km, I would imagine it'll hold its value quite well. RSVs have a keen following and are unlikely to lose their desirability in that time.

  12. #12
    Baby Twin
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    Other things things to mention are batteries, starter solenoids and brakes.

    the solenoid is used on mopeds and will eventually melt. RSVRs flatten batteries quite fast and when weak this increases the issue with the solenoid.

    I've tried most of the models in close proximity. My brother had the last of the Milles (04) then I got an 05 RSVR, he went for an 06 RSVR, with the ohlins and fake OZ wheels (that are heavier than the original 3 spokes) and I had an RSV factory that I converted for track days. On the road it's pretty much impossible to tell the difference between the RSVR models but they are, IMHO, a bit better than the Mille. As you are buying second hand a well looked after RSVR will out-perfom a neglected Factory model.

    The early model RSVRs (03/04) didn't come with radial brakes and whilst they aren't bad at all, it's always nice to have better brakes!

    One last thing, the Ohlins forks seem to get through a lot of seals so check when buying and account for replacement in the price if they are leaking

  13. #13
    Superbike Twin ride4fun's Avatar
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    I've had my 2009 RSV from new and haven't experienced these problems...yet. Maybe I've been lucky, or there have been design improvements. My bike is well maintained and is put away during the winter. Even so, I do know that these are common problems to look out for, and a well-cared for example is key.

  14. #14
    Baby Twin jack99ed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graveltrap View Post
    One last thing, the Ohlins forks seem to get through a lot of seals so check when buying and account for replacement in the price if they are leaking
    What sort of cost is it to replace the Seals? I've seen a few pages online that suggest a "quick-fix" and mine is only leaking very slightly, but didn't know if it was worth doing the job properly...

  15. #15
    Superbike Twin ride4fun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack99ed View Post
    What sort of cost is it to replace the Seals? I've seen a few pages online that suggest a "quick-fix" and mine is only leaking very slightly, but didn't know if it was worth doing the job properly...
    I was recently quoted about GBP 200.00 to replace the oil and seals by a specialist (not an Aprilia dealer), so budget somewhere around that.

  16. #16
    Baby Twin
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    If you are using a well known company that's the high end of the ball park. Last month I sent a set of MV forks to MCT (whom I would recommend) for a service and replacement seals plus polishing some scuffs out of the stanchions and it cost 182 inc. postage back.

    If you are a competent mechanic and have the correct tools (sometimes an issue with forks) you can change them yourself. Good quality seals and dust covers should cost around 30ish. Oil will be around 20-30 depending on the quality. So you can save possibly 100+. However I sent the MV forks out because it's very easy to tear the seals when fitting them on that particular fork, so it only takes a couple of failed attempts to have saved nothing!

    If you have something of say 04/05/06 vintage it could well be the beginning of the end for the seals, so a proper job is best if you intend to keep the bike. Something newer that hasn't had too hard a life may respond to a quick fix.

  17. #17
    Baby Twin andreas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack99ed View Post
    What sort of cost is it to replace the Seals? I've seen a few pages online that suggest a "quick-fix" and mine is only leaking very slightly, but didn't know if it was worth doing the job properly...



    It is always worth 'doing the job properly' . . ;-) A weeping seal is an MOT failure. Replacing fork seals is straightforward provided you have the correct tools and skills. However, if you do not, then don't attempt it - you could end up in very expensive country! I would recommend you call Griff at Home - Aprilia Performance (Tamworth area) for a quote.

  18. #18
    Baby Twin jack99ed's Avatar
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    Cheers mate. I've seen a few people mention these guys, and as I work in Birmingham it's fairly easy for me to run over there and get it done. I didn't really want to risk a DIY job on these, especially being Ohlins. And as I've only just bought it, I'm not trying to pass it off for someone else to deal with it.

  19. #19
    Baby Twin Bol D'or's Avatar
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    Interesting point made in post #2 about silencers.
    I've fitted Akrapovic silencers to my 2008 RSVR, I haven't noticed any running issues at all.
    Idles fine, picks up fine etc.
    Is the switch to map 2 essential, am I chancing holed pistons or other such maladies?

  20. #20
    Superbike Twin ride4fun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bol D'or View Post
    Interesting point made in post #2 about silencers.
    I've fitted Akrapovic silencers to my 2008 RSVR, I haven't noticed any running issues at all.
    Idles fine, picks up fine etc.
    Is the switch to map 2 essential, am I chancing holed pistons or other such maladies?
    Did you buy your bike from new? If not, maybe the previous owner had something like Akrapovic's fitted and the mapping switched, but didn't bother when putting the original cans back on. On the other hand, even though Map 1 probably won't cause any engine damage, I would still recommend you have it changed to Map 2, as it will then be tuned correctly for the different flow characteristics of the open silencers.

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