Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Buying RSV-R

  1. #1
    Baby Twin vanguillie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hampshire, UK
    Posts
    2

    Buying RSV-R

    Hey, how you all doing?

    Right I currently have a 1997 TL1000S which I am looking at trading in for a 2004 RSV-R. Can anyone inform me of any potential issue with the mille that i should be looking for when going to get one?

    Cheers in advance for all ya advice eh

  2. #2
    Baby Twin vanguillie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hampshire, UK
    Posts
    2
    I meant to also add:

    What are they like to ride when compared to other bikes like the TL,
    whats the performance like - acceleration/stopping/economy etc..

    Cheers guys

  3. #3
    Baby Twin Fazza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Peterborough
    Posts
    58
    Hi Vanguillie

    Someone has posted the following before, plenty of good points to look out for.........



    I've posted the following a few times in the past week on various forums, but I will post it again for you m8, you may well have read all this already ( more of a buying guide really, but some good advice in there anyway ) :-

    I posted this list a few times on both RSVR.net and Bikers Oracle in response to new guys looking for info, hope it helps:-

    Reliable as fook, these Mille's.

    In almost 3 years of ownership of a 2000 RSV, I've only had the sidestand and tilt switch go tits up on me.

    Battery was shagged at the start of the year, so needed a replacement but then again, it was the original one, so thats not so bad. Get an Optimate and keep it plugged in to solve that particular problem.

    Swap the gearing over from standard to 16/44 and I'll guarantee you will have a smile on yer face as wide as the Forth road bridge.

    Check its derestricted ( It most probably will be, but worth checking anyway ).

    The airbox, ECU wire snip and the exhaust *bung* in the standard silencer are the standard restrictions.

    Most RSV's are derestricted very early on in their life, usually either at the PDI or more commonly, after the first service ( the under 1000k one ).

    It's very rare indeed to find a Mille that is still in restricted trim, unless the dealer you bought it from new is a lazy git!!

    Lift the tank and seat, takes two minutes to check if its been done or not.

    Exhaust bung in standard can is easily spotted too. Just remove it and look up the pipe that bolts to the downpipe. You should see nothing.......if you see a cone type item with two bloody great spot-welds holding it on, thats a restrictor and it needs persuading out with a cold chisel and a big hammer.

    Here's some pics:-

    Green/Blue ECU wire, requires snipping to free up the second map:-



    Airbox bung location ( showing mine removed, I've got an Evo airkit nestled in there since this pic was taken );-




    Here's a pic of the exhaust bung ( spot welds circled ):-



    Full details of the derestriction procedure here:-

    http://www.geocities.com/sl_mille/derestrict.html


    Here's a quick list off the top of my head on some other shite:-
    • Make sure the battery is in tip top condition. Changing to a higher powered YTX14BS 12v-12AH one helps with starting problems.
    • Watch for sprag clutch problems. Cost a fortune to fix, although its not ridiculously common.
    • Check the swinging arm for dents on both sides, behind the exhaust can and on the other side down by the front of the gearchange lever. If the bike has been over on either side, these come into contact with the swingarm and leave marks/indentations.
    • Back brake works for 5 minutes after its bled, then vanishes. Common fault, happens to loads of folk. There are various methods of curing this, most of which have been covered here. Dont be put off the bike if the rear brake isn't feeling too great though.
    • Check for leaky radiators. And fit rad guards if you decide to go for a Mille, just in case.
    • Brake discs can warp, though again, not too common a prob.
    • Speedo can fail due to dodgy speed sensor which takes its pick up from the rear disc bolts.
    • Clutch fluid becomes dark coloured and looks well used within a few days of changing. This is normal.
    • Sidestand cut out switches can fail causing intermittent cutting out and hesitation. Theres a "workaround" for it or just replace the switch.
    • Tilt or Tipover switches can fail. Located under the seat just behind the battery. Uses microswitches to sense when the bike tilts over at a preset angle and cuts the fuel. When these start going on the blink some folk "bodge" them by filling them with sealant to stop the microswitches moving ( I had found spearmint chewing gum in mine :laff: ). Again, replacement is the cure.
    • Rear hugger bolts can seize if not greased when replaced ( and even if they are greased they can still seize ). Found that out to my cost in the last few days.
    • Starter relays can pack in, replacement with one from a GSXR1000 is an idea, better made and more reliable electrics apparently.
    • Oil leaks from cack handed mechanics who have done a valve clearance check and then caught the rubber seal on under the valve covers when refitting everything. Manifests itself as oil smoke coming off the exhausts ( may be from either front or rear cylinder ) and oil accumulating in the bellypan and soaking the sound deadening material within.
    • Excess oil is blown out into the airbox and accumulates there if the oil tank is overfilled. Again, you will notice oil smoke and possible a drip from the bike. These engines have seperate oil tanks and no sump, filling is a bit different to other bikes. Start bike, take it up to operating temp until the fans cut in or better still, go for a quick ride on it. Stop bike and check sight tube for oil with the bike upright on level ground, immediately after switch off. There are two marks "Min and "Max". As long as there is oil visible in the sight tube, you are good to go. Does not have to be anywhere over halfway, otherwise you will risk the oil in the airbox thingy. Most folk keep the oil in the bottom 1/3 of the tube and this seems the best level to avoid oil blowback. Mille's can sometimes use a fair bit of oil. Check it more regularly than you would any previous bike you have had.
    • Fully synthetic oil can cause clutch slippage. Most people ( and some here will disagree, I know ) stick with a good Semi-synthetic oil. I use Rock Oil Guardian 10/40.
    • Engine, especially top-end, can sound a bit noisy/tappity. Very common, the Rotax V990 isn't the quietest of lumps.

  4. #4
    lees rsv
    Guest
    Dont be put off by all that i have not had a TL i have had gsxr,s zx7r and my ape is the best one i have had as long as you keep the battery in tip top you will be ok and fall in love with it

  5. #5
    Evil Twin whitetrash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Scumerset
    Posts
    365
    I have a 2003 RSVR Nero...

    Will do you a PX on your TL!!!

    (must fight the TL Fetish, must fight!!!)


    Sorry i love TL's

Similar Discussions

  1. Looking at buying an '01 RSV
    By Frankie in forum Aprilia RSVR
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: June 14th, 2011, 07:37 AM
  2. buying a rsv
    By joshyp in forum Aprilia RSVR
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: February 17th, 2011, 02:46 PM
  3. Buying an RSV tips
    By pompey-pimp in forum Aprilia RSVR
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: July 19th, 2009, 01:15 PM
  4. Buying my first Mille
    By kibb_dj in forum Aprilia RSV Mille
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: July 10th, 2009, 05:46 AM
  5. Considering buying a RSV Factory
    By wheels in forum Aprilia RSVR
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: April 4th, 2009, 10:52 PM

Search tags for this page

Click on a term to search for related topics.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •