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Thread: Slipper Clutch

  1. #1
    Baby Twin Mr_Damage's Avatar
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    Slipper Clutch

    I know there have been some threads about the basic slipper clutch before but I thought I would start a new one, as I dont think mine is working well, if at all.
    I did my first track day at Silverstone on Monday, and one of my biggest problems was the downshift and stopping the rear wheel from locking (had a few great slides, but not what I was planning ).
    I know that I need to check the vacuum pipe and the valve to check it is all working, but thats pretty much all I know about it at the moment.

    Questions.
    How does it all work, I think it is based on a vacuum, but where does the pipe go to to gat the vacuum.
    Any more suggestions on how to make the best of the standard slipper?
    Any recomendations on a proper slipper clutch?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Baby Twin
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    Hi,

    Cant really answer many of your questions....but the clutch gets the vacuum off of a take off from the throttle body, this goes through the 1 way valve, then t's into 2 pipes, one of which I assume goes to the clutch diaphragm. I don't really know how it works, but at a guess I would say the vacuum induces a slight operation of the clutch, thus allowing it to reduce the power to the wheel....and it does it when the throttle is closed therefore at max vacuum (?) all just a guess!

    However, there are 'real' slipper clutches avaliable, here is one I found on ebay:

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/APRILIA-RSV-10...3A1%7C294%3A50

  3. #3
    spoonz
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    Have a read


    Line 1 is connected to the intake passage whereas line 2 – downstream of the retaining valve – is connected to
    the airbox via the throttle valve. Line 3 links line 2 to the airbox when the throttle valve opens to an angle greater
    than 10-12 degrees.
    During deceleration, the system configuration is as shown in the figure.
    The negative pressure in the intake passages is transmitted to the clutch membrane via line 1+2.
    The ‘retaining’ valve (non-return) comes into play and stabilises the pressure in the line.
    Consequently, the clutch discs slip and reduce the torque.
    During acceleration (throttle valve >12°), the valve, connected on the throttle unit axis, links up line 2 with the
    airbox, thus cancelling out the pressing effect on the clutch unit and taking the clutch pack back to its original
    position.



  4. #4
    Superbike Twin buffalo's Avatar
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    If you dont want to buy a proper slipper clutch try slipping your clutch on downshifts with your clutch lever, old fashioned way but works.

  5. #5
    Baby Twin Mr_Damage's Avatar
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    All very interesting, thanks for your helpful replies, I can see how it all works now.
    So I need to check the retaining valve and integrity of all the pipes, I may try and be a bit clever and connect a vacuum guage to the pipe with a t-piece and check the vacuum on my dyno, this will give me some interesting checks and figures regarding the vacuum, or lack of it.
    In practice, how well should this work?
    Proper slipper sounds the way forward, but the price tag is maybe more than I can warrent on the old girl, so I may have to learn to slip on downshift. Tricky to get right I guess, but worth the practice.

  6. #6
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    Sorry to resurrect this thread, but just for the uninformed (ie: me !), I seem to remember, that when I had my last twins, a Suzuki TL1000R, and a Honda Firestorm, that you could give yourself a problem if you changed down too quickly whilst at too high a rev-range, which caused an un-nerving lock up of the back wheel........

    I take it that this SHOULDN`T happen now, if your slipper clutch is doing its job correctly ?

    (Apologies for the numpty question, but the slipper-clutch is a new one on me )

  7. #7
    Superbike Twin vinny rsvr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dexter View Post
    Sorry to resurrect this thread, but just for the uninformed (ie: me !), I seem to remember, that when I had my last twins, a Suzuki TL1000R, and a Honda Firestorm, that you could give yourself a problem if you changed down too quickly whilst at too high a rev-range, which caused an un-nerving lock up of the back wheel........

    I take it that this SHOULDN`T happen now, if your slipper clutch is doing its job correctly ?

    (Apologies for the numpty question, but the slipper-clutch is a new one on me )
    the slipper clutch only works with the throttle off, dont blip it on the downshift mate

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by vinny rsvr View Post
    the slipper clutch only works with the throttle off, dont blip it on the downshift mate
    Understood; cheers Vinny

  9. #9
    Superbike Twin vinny rsvr's Avatar
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    by the way DEX, how you enjoying the new bike

  10. #10
    Evil Twin Wolf's Avatar
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    Dexter,
    my understanding is that the vacuum operated slipper clutch on milles are designed more to help reduce the chance of a lockup than to completely prevent it, i would not reccomend relying too much on it as have heard plenty of stories about people locking and skidding out of control trying to test it out

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by vinny rsvr View Post
    by the way DEX, how you enjoying the new bike

    Thanks for asking mate; the bike`s awesome. Read my brief thoughts HERE.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf View Post
    Dexter,
    my understanding is that the vacuum operated slipper clutch on milles are designed more to help reduce the chance of a lockup than to completely prevent it, i would not reccomend relying too much on it as have heard plenty of stories about people locking and skidding out of control trying to test it out

    Cheers Wolf; thanks for the advice.

    My question was more for my info really, rather than taking as gospel, and unfortunately, I don`t possess the skills necessary to get myself out the sh1t should things go wrong, so I won`t be testing out the effectiveness of the slipper-clutch.........not voluntarily anyway

    In all seriousness though mate, thanks; I appreciate it, as I know you`re only trying to prevent me attempting something daft.........cheers.

  13. #13
    Evil Twin Wolf's Avatar
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    i have in my own way tried to see if it really worked and im pretty sure i could tell its effects but im not mad enough to really need the thing to work riding on roads so i cant say if it was of any real benefit

    its nice to know its there, but its certainly not foolproof, although i dont believe the proper slipper clutchs are either

  14. #14
    Superbike Twin vinny rsvr's Avatar
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    the aprilia system is a bit crap, not as good as the proper slipper clutch on say a honda fireblade

  15. #15
    A303
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    I shouldn't worry Dex as you only really need it on the track - don't think mine works anyway as I've had a couple of lock-ups. You should only be changing down in a straight line so if the back does lock you can just whip the clutch in and then feed it out again - no big drama really.

  16. #16
    Superbike Twin vinny rsvr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A303 View Post
    I shouldn't worry Dex as you only really need it on the track - don't think mine works anyway as I've had a couple of lock-ups. You should only be changing down in a straight line so if the back does lock you can just whip the clutch in and then feed it out again - no big drama really.
    good advice, as the bike should be set up before the corner in correct gear, correct entry ect

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by A303 View Post
    I shouldn't worry Dex as you only really need it on the track - don't think mine works anyway as I've had a couple of lock-ups. You should only be changing down in a straight line so if the back does lock you can just whip the clutch in and then feed it out again - no big drama really.
    Cheers mate, and all good advice, ie; slow in, fast out, etc......certainly on the roads anyway.

    I still remember having to whip the clutch in here and there on the Firestorm, which was a bit of a pig for locking the back if you weren`t careful !

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